Feeling Good

This week the progress in setting up the new firm has felt good. It is three months since Richard Hovey and Associates Ltd was incorporated (on 18th October 2007) and it feels as if momentum is building. I am pleased to be spending more time with clients, and also to have competed some negotiations with suppliers that I started before Christmas.

I have been looking for a competitive and helpful supplier of Public Liability and Professional Indemnity Insurance, and I have found that through Towergate Professional Risks (they are brokers; my policy is underwritten by Royal & Sun Alliance Insurance plc). Members of some professional institutions can benefit from corporate agreements.

I have been looking for a local accountant that I feel that I get on with, who understands what I am up to, and looks like giving a good service including forward-looking advice. It has been imporant to me that the firm is switched on about taxation, so a firm that comprises both Chartered Accountants and Chartered Tax Advisers is likely to be a good choice. I have decided to work with Chippenham firm Carter Dutton.

Transforming anger for good

Browsing through the latest newsletter from Ekklesia I came across a “so true” article by Gene Stoltzfus about making the anger in us a force for good. He draws his conclusions from his work with Christian Peacemaker Teams. Read the article in his blog (or republished by Ekklesia).

To add thoughts from Julia Cameron, in her book The Artist's Way, as she speaks of how to think when we find that we are angry: “Anger is fuel… anger is meant to be listened to… anger is a map. I like the idea that, if we don't let it overcome us or turn into hatred (as Gene puts it), it helps to show us the way forward.

Celebrating first SIMA client

I am excited that my investment in SIMATM Who do you think you are? training is bearing fruit, and a good addition to my coaching work.

So, the new business is building (praise God!) and this week I have also met with the Wilsher Group again to look at ways forward of collaboration, with particular interest in their coaching work and use of the Insights Discovery Personal Profile which is based on Jungian typology.

Extreme Pilgrim (3)

Christian encounters Christianity – in one of its most ancient forms amongst the Copts of Egypt. In this third episode (televised yesterday) Peter spends three weeks in a cave in the desert, following the example of the Desert Fathers. They were the first ever monks: living in isolated communities they gained a reputation of closeness to God and great practical wisdom.

Whereas his guides in the previous two episodes had seemed to be encouraging him towards (personal) enlightenment, I felt that here he was introduced to a greater cosmic purpose: that his solitude and prayer might not only affect him but the wider world. Effectiveness in prayer in this sense is about persevering by fighting the demons that become apparent (at the least in the mind).

Having struggled with the silence and solitude, by the middle of his third week he was starting to enjoy it, and – with a face that had started to show joy – he looked forward to “another beautiful day; another difficult day.” Life is difficult, if we engage with it.

At the end of his stay he reflected that the battle is about making good choices. (In my mind this connects with the importance of Discernment.) He said that not to join this battle (of concern about truth and what is right) is to be numb. He admitted that when he arrived he had been numb, but that he was now waking up. This felt painful, he said, like being born.

This is a challenge to us all to develop our “inner life,” and to seek appropriate help to do so, and to deal with what we find there.

Before he went up the mountain he spent time in the monastery, commenting that the Orthodox form of worship had many differences as well as similarities to that which he was familiar with. In an aside he noted that the practice of prostration when praying was an ancient Christian practice before the Muslims took it on.

Mobile Phone Tips

4 THINGS YOU PROBABLY NEVER KNEW YOUR MOBILE PHONE COULD DO

There are a few things that can be done in times of grave emergencies. Your mobile phone can actually be a life saver or an emergency tool for survival. Check out the things that you can do with it:

FIRST Emergency

The Emergency Number worldwide for Mobile is 112. If you find yourself out of the coverage area of your mobile; network and there is an emergency, dial 112 and the mobile will search any existing network to establish the emergency number for you, and interestingly this number 112 can be dialled even if the keypad is locked. Try it out.

SECOND Have you locked your keys in the car?

Does your car have remote keyless entry? This may come in handy someday. Good reason to own a cell phone: If you lock your keys in the car and the spare keys are at home, call someone at home on their mobile phone from your cell phone.

Hold your cell phone about a foot from your car door and have the person at your home press the unlock button, holding it near the mobile phone on their end. Your car will unlock. Saves someone from having to drive your keys to you. Distance is no object. You could be hundreds of miles away, and if you can reach someone who has the other 'remote' for your car, you can unlock the doors (or the boot). Editor's Note: It works fine! We tried it out and it unlocked our car over a mobile phone!'

THIRD Hidden Battery Power

Imagine your mobile battery is very low. To activate, press the keys *3370# Your mobile will restart with this reserve and the instrument will show a 50% increase in battery. This reserve will get charged when you charge your mobile next time.

FOURTH How to disable a STOLEN mobile phone?

To check your Mobile phone's serial number, key in the following digits on your phone: * # 0 6 #

A 15 digit code will appear on the screen. This number is unique to your handset. Write it down and keep it somewhere safe. When your phone get stolen, you can phone your service provider and give them this code. They will then be able to block your handset so even if the thief changes the SIM card, your phone will be totally useless. You probably won't get your phone back,but at least you know that whoever stole it can't use/sell it either. If everybody does this, there would be no point in peoplestealing mobile phones.

The information above is as received in an e-mail – I have not checked it.